Can't Send Email From Your Cable/DSL Connection

 

If Gotham Bus is providing your email service, you may find that at some point you are no longer able to send mail from your cable or DSL connection using our servers(s).  This is a common problem.  Most broadband ISPs now block outbound email on the standard SMTP port (25) as part of an overall anti-spam strategy.  If this happens, you have two choices:

1. Continue to use our server as your SMTP server, but change your port number from 25 to 587.  All Gotham Bus customer-facing mail servers are configured to use port 587 as an alternate port.  Simply use the same server for outbound (SMTP) as you do for inbound (POP or IMAP) and specify port 587 instead of 25.  You'll need to configure your mail software to authenticate using the same information as your incoming mail settings.

or

2. Use the SMTP server(s) provided by your cable or DSL provider.  We don't know what those servers are, so you'll have to ask your ISP for that information.  Be aware that come broadband ISPs will not allow you to use their SMTP server(s) to send mail from your own domain name without paying for a "business" account.  In that case it is best to use our server(s) on port 587, however some of those same ISPs also block port 587 in an effort to force customers to pay for more expensive accounts.  Unfortunately we can't do anything about this and it appears to be a growing issue.


 

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